Interview: Voice actor Jon Bailey from Honest Trailers at MomoCon 2015 pt 1

Chances are you know who Jon Bailey is, but just don’t realize it. Not only has Bailey been doing voice over and voice acting work in movie trailers, video games (most notably as the Council Spokesperson in the XCOM franchise), and animation for several years, he is well known as the “Epic Voice” of Honest Trailers on YouTube.

At MomoCon 2015, Bailey took time out of his day to sit with TAM and talk about Honest Trailers, his own YouTube channel, and his career in voice acting.

This is a two-part interview! To read part two, click here.

Jon Bailey poses with XCOM cosplayer Brian Mead at MomoCon 2015

Jon Bailey poses with XCOM cosplayer Brian Mead at MomoCon 2015


How has MomoCon been for you?

So far it has been good! Nobody crazy that tried to get hair follicles to clone me or anything like that.

So, you seem to have a pretty sizable fan-base now. Has your popularity because of the Honest Trailers been a surprise to you?

YES! It really was. Honestly, I thought the job was just another YouTube request, because I had my own YouTube channel and people would contact me when they would find me and say “You’re really good with this… could you help me with that…” I usually, if I had the time would say “yeah, sure.” When Screen Junkies contacted me, I thought it was the same thing. To be honest, I didn’t even look at the views to see how popular they were, and they were already pretty popular back then. In the millions of views. To me that was pretty good. Now, the views are insane! I think the Frozen one has like 24 million plus. They get like three million a week and just continue to grow. It just continues to get bigger and bigger and bigger… now we have our own official San Diego Comic Con panel this year!

I always thought, if I did get on a Comic Con panel, which I’d always wanted to do, it would be on a voice actor panel. I’ve been doing this stuff for six years, and I’m already on a Comic Con panel. I mean, the size of the crowd in that Honest Trailers MomoCon panel that we just did shocked me. I thought, “It’s Sunday morning… it’s 11 a.m… people are hungover and were up all night…” but yet, they packed the room! It was freaking amazing!

When you do your work with the Honest Trailers team(s), do you have a contract with them?

No, it’s just job to job. We fly by the seat of our pants… kind of a “bro code.”

 

As a voice over artist, are you a part of the Screen Actor’s Guild?

Yes.

Do you need to be a part of guild in order to do what you do?

For YouTube? No, because it’s basically a collaboration. The way I kind of do it, because I improvise a bit, it’s kind of like helping write with the script. I have my YouTube channel, they have their channel, so they link to me in video descriptions, and they’ve annotated me before, so it helps grow my own channel on the side. So, it’s like a back and forth kind of thing. If it was an “official voice-over” job, they probably wouldn’t want to do it because it would be too expensive.

It’s weird with the multimedia stuff because they are still working on how to work out residuals and is it technically voice over work or is it on camera work? I don’t know all the legalities and all the issues of how that works. It’s not something I auditioned for because it was just like “oh, this guy seems to be cool, let’s work with him and make videos together.”

Now, for real trailers, those jobs go through the Screen Actor’s Guild. If you’re doing non-union trailers then A) you’re probably getting ripped off and B) someone is doing something they’re not supposed to be doing. The only downside to doing movie trailers, there are no residuals in that type of work, whereas in animation and even in most commercials, as long as it’s running you get paid some kind of residual. So, yeah, those are the kind of jobs you want to get, the kind that continue to pay. I’ve only got a handful of residual jobs. I did one for Jimmy Kimmel and every time someone decides to download that episode or anytime that episode re-airs over breaks, I get paid a little money. But, the longer it’s on the air, the smaller those checks will get. A lot of the biggest voice actors live off of the residuals if they’re not currently working.

There was a movie that came out a couple of years ago about trailer voice-over actors called In a World. What was your opinion of it? Was it an accurate representation of the business?

It was very, very close to the truth. I mean, obviously they put a lot of movie elements in it to make it a romantic comedy story instead of a straight up reflection of the business, but it’s absolutely true. There are very few women in promo work. You might hear women voice overs on Oxygen or Lifetime or some of the kid’s stuff like in the movie, but yeah it’s actually 100% true. It’s not fair at all. In any part of the business, there’s so much more work for men than for women.

One of the other voice actor MomoCon guests and I were talking about that last night. She said that for every 20 male roles, there’s like two or three for the women. It seems like the handful that are getting hired are from one little group, so the others, who aren’t a part of that group have to work three times as hard to book anything.

The cool thing about that movie is that I know a few of those people, and they actually are playing who they are in real life. Marc Graue is in a scene where there is a big party. He’s the guy with the glasses and a ponytail. He’s actually a voice actor and director and he works out of Marc Graue Studio in Los Angeles. The voice of CBS, Joe Cipriano was in that group, playing himself. Fred Melamed, the guy who plays the retiring voice actor, really is a voice actor in real life. They used a lot of voice actors for the film, which is cool I think.

In terms of vocal work, what has been the most difficult job that you have ever done?

Oh boy. When I worked on the very first XCOM game. There was a character called The Elder, the final boss at the end. His voice required two separate voices to record. I had to literally read all of his lines twice in two different voices. I had just left a convention in Dallas and my voice was in really bad shape.  All I had was that one Sunday to go from Dallas to Los Angeles to rest and then we recorded on Monday.

Click the PLAY button below to hear the rest of Bailey’s answer to this question:

 

Are there specific tricks or exercises that you do to maintain your voice health?

Click the PLAY button below to hear Bailey’s answer to this question:


To read part two of the TAM interview with Jon Bailey, click here.

Interview: Voice actor Jon Bailey from Honest Trailers at MomoCon 2015 pt 2

This is a two-part interview! To read part one, click here.

Chances are you know who Jon Bailey is, but just don’t realize it. Not only has Bailey been doing voice over and voice acting work in movie trailers, video games (most notably as the Council Spokesperson in the XCOM franchise) and animation for several years, he is well known as the “Epic Voice” of Honest Trailers on YouTube.

At MomoCon 2015, Bailey took time out of his day to sit with TAM and talk about Honest Trailers, his own YouTube channel, and his career in voice acting.

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Do you ever worry that any of the satire videos you do might cost you work from the movie and gaming industries?

That was a concern, and I’ve tried very hard, and the bigger Honest Trailers gets, the harder it’s going to be to differentiate the Honest Trailers from my career. Honest Trailers is not part of my career. It’s part of my YouTube thing that I am trying to make into… maybe a backup job. You can make some good money from YouTube. Anybody that is averaging over a million views per video is going to make some decent money.

I have my own YouTube channel that I’m trying to grow where I do movie reviews in the movie trailer voice, because that makes perfect sense. I do this thing called imitation gaming where I talk like a character who is playing their own game, like John Madden playing Madden NFL. I thought those were unique concepts, because while I am not a great gamer, I can do voices, and it’s a funny excuse to do impressions. It’s entertaining, and that’s what the point of YouTube is: to be entertained. I mean, sometimes it’s informational, but mostly it’s entertainment. I do some voice over tips because people ask me a lot of questions and then I don’t have to worry about FAQ’s anymore. I just have them check out a playlist and their question is answered.

So, I saw the Honest Trailers as a way to grow my channel. Right now I only have 74,000 subscribers, and while most people think that’s really good, Honest Trailers has 5 million. I don’t compare myself to those guys, but that’s the direction I need to go. So, anytime I can collaborate with any other YouTube channels to grow my own channel, I consider that not a part of my voice over career, even if it is voice related. It’s really me trying to grow my YouTube channel as a source of income. It’s still fun for me though, and hopefully it will remain that way.

But, back to the original question, I have to keep the YouTube and the voice-over work separate, because of my representation and the union. Also, I don’t want people to lump in Honest Trailers with my main career because I don’t want people to think that I’m not a real voice actor and that I just do the “fake” movie trailer voice. If you listen to my real work vs. my Honest Trailers work, you can hear the difference. The Honest Trailers voice has become his own character. He’s not just a narrator anymore. He’s this guy who has emotions and gets mad when the movie’s bad; he questions things in the movie and breaks character a lot.

My first manager thought that I should be branded as the Honest Trailers voice, but I didn’t want to do that. I didn’t want movie studios to see me as “oh, he’s THAT guy.” I mean, other than a comedy or two, that won’t work. It’s a gimmick, really. It’s funny, but it’s not the best way to sell a movie. The point of a real movie trailer is to get people to go see the film, so I have to convince people that it is the best movie ever made.

Knock on wood, the satire hasn’t affected my career. Most of the people I’ve worked with have known and thought it was really funny.

 

 

So, what projects do you have that you’re really excited about?

I’m so excited, but I can’t say a thing about them. All I can say is that if you do love to hate the council guy from XCOM, then keep an eye and ear out. (EDITORS NOTE – The day after this interview, the new XCOM trailer was released on to the internet, and you can hear Jon Bailey a couple of times throughout the trailer, but his big moment comes toward the end of the video above.)

Also, there is a new sequel video game that I contributed a lot to. Fingers crossed, it is supposed to be announced at E3.

(EDITORS NOTE: This interview took place before E3, so Bailey couldn’t tell us the specifics about this project. During our interview he never mentioned the name of the property. Make sure to follow Jon Bailey on Facebook for more updates on this upcoming project!”

I’m not the lead role, but being a part of it is definitely something to add to my resume. My character gets to interact with the players more than normal in games. Usually in games, with this kind of character you hear a little bit from them, but all the game you’ll be hearing from my character, which is really cool. For me, it was another chance to expand my acting chops and get to do some really fun work.

There is nothing more fun than getting killed by a bunch of stuff or getting attacked in the games. They call those “barks” and “efforts.” In “efforts” it’s grunts and strains, and in “barks,” you’re yelling things like “MEDIC” or “GRENADE!” Anything you have to yell is considered a “bark.” We rocked through about 130 of those. With the other lines, we would do three or four of those at a time, because all I have is a list of lines and I am relying on the director to tell me what’s going on to make it make sense and how I should say it or how I should act. With the “barks,” it’s easy… bad things are happening.

When we talked to Crispin Freeman (see our interview here), he mentioned that most times you don’t know anything about your character…

Nope. Not a clue. There’s usually not a picture or anything. And if we don’t know anything about the franchise, then it’s even more difficult. But, in this game, the guys really wanted believable, normal voices because it really helps the player adapt and get into it. With my character, they said my voice really matched the character and that while I didn’t know what he looked like, they knew what was going on and it was perfect. “Trust us.”

The one thing I have learned about games is that usually you have to speak in a slower speed because they have to time it with the subtitles. Most games have subtitles, which is why they talk at an unusual speed. They have to make sure the audio fits into the time it takes you to read the subtitles. This time they were cool about speaking at a normal human speed. They wanted it to be a little more believable so a little bit quicker was fine. Usually I get asked to slow down because I am so used to doing fifteen second trailers. They give me a minute’s worth of information to squeeze into fifteen seconds. That is very difficult to do and I end up sounding like the guy at the end of the car commercials thats reading all the legal jargon.


Follow John Bailey on Facebook and check out his YouTube channel!

Why MomoCon is the place to be in Atlanta this weekend

This afternoon we sat down with Dan Carroll, the Director of Media Relations for MomoCon 2015, and talked about the convention, what fans can expect this year, and why the Georgia World Congress Center is the happening place to be in Atlanta this weekend.


This is MomoCon’s first year here at the Georgia World Congress Center, and it looks like it is shaping up to be an amazing one! How has the attendance been this year, compared to last?

We are anticipating 20,000 total attendees… last year we had 14,600. The move to the new venue has obviously given us more opportunity, more exposure, and a lot more fun for the people coming. We have convenient parking, MARTA takes the local Atlanta folks right to the conference center, and as you can see from where we’re sitting, we have this amazing, giant, enormous vendor area and the largest gaming square footage area in the southeast at a convention.

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This year it is very apparent how important the inclusion of gaming is to MomoCon’s programming. Is this a sign of the direction MomoCon plans to take moving forward?

Absolutely. We’ve had gaming since our first MomoCon. In fact, MomoCon directors would meet together on a regular basis to play analog games and also plan out the convention. It works out that we just happen to adore games. We’ve had some amazing LAN/console gaming competitions in the past, and right now you and I are looking down on the show floor and can see how large the LAN area is, as well as the console gaming. But, the big new amazing thing is the indie game developer showcase.

The showcase is providing an opportunity for new developers to show their work, and the showcase itself is juried. There are a number of industry experts that are going to be reviewing the games, judging them and giving out cash prizes.

Moving forward, is the indie game developer showcase going to become an even bigger part of MomoCon’s programming?

We are Georgia’s anime and gaming convention. The gaming is going to continue to grow and the anime is going to grow too. Also, it’s not just anime, but American animation too. Next year, I think you’re going to see a lot of growth in the comics area.

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How long do you see MomoCon being booked here at the GWCC? 

I believe we’re currently booked through 2019, and we do have contingencies for growth into other halls here at the GWCC, but we’re going to take it one year at a time and make sure we do the best we can. What we do here at MomoCon is focus on the end-user/attendee experience. The membership brings a lot of fun with it.

What have you personally been the most excited about with MomoCon 2015?

Well, a number of things. We have some of my favorite voice actors here this year. I just got off of a panel with Crispin Freeman, the voice actor who performed as Alucard in “Hellsing.” He does an amazing job. I also got to meet with Greg Weisman, (writer, developer and showrunner in several American animations including “Gargoyles,” and “Star Wars Rebels”) which was great.

Probably for me more than anything else is to see how comfortable, relaxed and filled with enjoyment the fan-base is here. People have commented about our diversity in terms of age, race, gender, LGBT, and how everyone is completely accepted. We are just a warm environment, and as always, anytime you have any event in Atlanta, it’s filled with a lot of hospitality.

What would you say to parents with kids that may be interested in coming to MomoCon, but are unsure of its content and family friendliness? 

There is still plenty of opportunity for people to come and enjoy MomCom 2015, and MomoCon 2016 is just around the corner. The one thing families need to know is that all of our programming is “all-ages” appropriate, 24 hours a day. There are no late night panels that are adult oriented or inappropriate for anybody. We have a pretty solid dress code and we like to make sure that our customers are presenting themselves in the best possible way. We also like to make sure that we are following standards that are family friendly and inclusive.

What kind of programming do you have for the kids?

Well, card gaming is always big, but this year it seems to have exploded. We also have the Chalk Twins here, and yesterday we had a sidewalk chalk art competition here. It turned out really well. The weather has helped out a lot.


MOMOCON IS GOING ON ALL WEEKEND. VISIT HTTP://WWW.MOMOCON.COM TO FIND OUT MORE INFORMATION.