CD Review: “Slaves Of The Shadow Realm” by Legion Of The Damned

Dutch metal quartet Legion Of The Damned have unleashed its unholy seventh record, Slaves Of The Shadow Realm.

Album opener “The Widow’s Breed” is a blistering track with chainsaw guitar slicing through thrashing drum beats. The lyrical imagery of African witchcraft is especially interesting and a wonderful departure of the conventional satanic/anti-Christian themes.

“Nocturnal Commando” continues with the African lyrical content the previous track as a tribute to Ogun, the God of Iron in the Yoruba religion. Guitarist Twan van Geel’s unrelenting riffs easily keep pace with Erik Fleuren’s ferocious drumming.

Things briefly slow down on the “Charnel Confession” which maintains an uneasy rhythm throughout the song’s duration. There are numerous guitar fills that complement “Confession’s” fierty atmosphere.

“Slaves Of The Southern Cross” is a demonic grooving tune as the band plays in the pocket before speeding things up during the midsection. The chopping guitar riffs and double bass drums conclude the track in hellish fashion.

“Warhounds of Hades”commences with a colossal drum pattern before descending in to a crushing thrash number. Geel’s aggressive double picking in the main riff drives this track, and the midsection will arouse a mosh pit.

“Priest Hunt” features a haunting symphonic sample that segues in to a galloping pattern and a meat hook guitar riff. A contrast from the thrash fused black metal on prior tracks, yet it still fits on Shadow Realm.

Album closer “Dark Coronation” is the longest track on the record at a shade under six minutes. There is a hardcore punk influence on this track that elides with some complex guitar riffs making it a killer album closer.

Shadow Realm is a collision of black, death, thrash metal and punk but Legion pulls it off for most of the record. Some songs are a bit too long, causing the record to drag. Luckily, Legion’s musical prowess compensates for the album’s few low moments. The production is on point, especially on tracks like “Priest Hunt” with the extra scoop on the guitars. The band also experiments with symphonic samples and a melancholy piano intro “Slaves Of The Demonic Mind.” There are a few good surprises on this record.

Legion Of The Damned bring the goods on Slaves Of The Shadow Realm. Fans of Goatwhore and fellow Dutch metal band God Dethroned will appreciate the band’s melding of metal subgenres. However, this album falls slightly short on some tracks. Still, it is a very good album to lead us in to 2019. The dark gods will appreciate this offering.

Check out the band’s official website:

http://www.legionofthedamned.net/

CD Review: “The Hunt For White Christ” by Unleashed

Unleashed celebrate its 30th anniversary next year and it is fitting that the Swedish death metal masters release a new record. The Hunt For White Christ is album number thirteen, and is rife with the viking imagery, thrashing riffs and pounding drums the band is known for.

“Lead Us Into War” engulfs the listener in a blizzard of piercing riffs which form a hammer that swings down during the chorus. It is a superb track to open White Christ.Unfortunately the following track “You Will Fall” stifles the album’s momentum. It is not a bad track, but sounds subdued compared to the opening track.

“Stand Your Ground” picks things up with its mid paced main riff and stomping chorus. Vocalist and bassist Johnny Hedlund’s guttural vocals are decipherable and there is an added urgency in his voice as he urges listeners to make a stand and fight. Guitarists Fredrik Folkare and Tomas Olsson lay down some bluesy leads with a classical flair.

The album really picks up on “Terror Christ” with its grinding guitar riffs that sound like a tank descending upon a city in ruins. The guitar leads are again incredible and complement the dark vibe on this track. “They Rape The Land” continues the auditory assault with a galloping thrash riff that causes instant whiplash. This track has several rhythm changes that capture the chaos of battle but it all flows well.

“The City Of Jorsala Shall Fall” is notable for its Middle Eastern inspired chorus riff, which complements the song title as Jorsala is Swedish for Jerusalem. It is another mid paced stomper with sharp riffs that cut at every turn. The title track is a short blast of pummeling drums and bludgeoning guitars that are lockstep with one another. It is the shortest track on the record and the most straightforward.

“Open To All The World” is a blistering track with a smidgen of hardcore for good measure. It rarely relents and concludes the album with a dissonant acoustic guitar.

The Hunt For White Christ shows how impressive Unleashed sounds when it is focused. The album’s second half is almost perfect, as the songs flow well and take the listener on an exciting and bloody journey. That does not mean the first half of White Christ is bad. However, a couple of tracks are rather disjointed and slightly weak compared to the second half. The production is great with special notice to the guitar tones, particularly the solos. The leads are clear and at times possess a supernal feel. The rhythm changes on these tracks are seamless and heighten the overall excitement of the album.

The Hunt For White Christ is the band’s thirteenth album, but it is certainly not unlucky. Unleashed fire on all cylinders for most of the record proving once again its status as a legendary death metal band. Fans will enjoy this record as the few weaker tracks are eclipsed by the entire record. Unleashed should continue the hunt when it results in killer albums like this.

Check out the band’s official website for news and tour dates:

http://www.unleashed.se/odalheim/index.php

CD Review: “Scourge Of The Enthroned” by Krisiun

Krisiun’s eleventh record, Scourge Of The Enthroned, is a colossal slab of merciless blast beats and armor crushing riffs. The title track opens this album with a hellish, yet grandiose riff before slamming straight to hell. Drummer Max Kolesne’s chaotic blast beats synchronize with Moyses Kolesne’s chainsaw guitars throughout the song. The song’s seamless rhythm changes make for an unpredictable and exciting listen.

“Demonic III” is possibly a tribute to this brotherly trio, whose music could conjure a thousand devils. The pulverizing stop start riff sets the mood of this track before the band plays even faster! Moyses even treats us to several guitar leads sandwiched between the monolithic drums and riffs. Meanwhile, bassist and vocalist Alex Camargo’s guttural vocals match the song’s intensity. The song’s crushing midsection solidifies this song as one of the best in the band’s 28 year existence.

Max’s drumming on “Slay The Prophet” advances like an army upon a defenseless city. Once again the track’s midsection provides the listener a slight break as the band settles into brief, albeit nice groove before switching back to heavy mode. Krisiun’s thrash influence shows on “A Thousand Graves” with its fast tempo before transitioning to a rolling blast beat pattern. The riffs on this track strike like several spikes at once. Album closer “Whirlwind Of Immortality” commences with a twisting riff that is joined by rapid drumming, before alternating between a broken galloping riff and a staccato riffing bolstered by blast beats. A fitting end for a record structured on uncertainty and technical chaos.

Scourge Of The Enthroned is Krisiun at its most technical, yet its most dynamic. The complex song structures are at times catchy but never ambitious. Technical death metal bands often fall victim to emphasizing musicianship over emotion, yet Krisiun avoids this common pitfall. You can chalk it up to experience, however Scourge’s brevity is also a main factor. It features just eight tracks and is barely 38 minutes in length. Therefore, Krisiun spend little time fooling about and get right to business. The album’s production superb which is expected from this trio. The drumming and guitars are up front and one can easily hear every time change, riff and lead.

Krisiun once again prove why it is extreme metal royalty on this record. Scourge Of The Enthroned shows a band operating at top performance with several tracks that will certainly become fan favorites. Fans should not worry about the album’s length compared to the band’s past three releases as the songs are around four to six minutes in length. This record certainly takes the throne.

Check out Krisiun’s official Facebook page for news and tour dates:

https://www.facebook.com/krisiun.official/

Slayer Final World Tour

Fifteen thousand metal-heads, ninety degrees of Georgia heat, five thrash bands, and one dixie storm was the formula for the Atlanta stop of Slayer’s current tour on Friday, August 10. Luckily the rain ceased before the beginning of the show, but an early afternoon downpour made sure Cellairis Amphitheater at Lakewood was a steamy cauldron of blood, sweat, beer, and metal for what could be Slayer fans’ last chance to see the band live. Slayer has announced they will be retiring following the conclusion on this tour.

No one would expect to Slayer to end their career quietly and they certainly lived up to expectations enlisting Lamb of God, Anthrax, Testament, and Napalm Death as opening acts to give the thrash kings a proper send off. All the bands date back to the early eighties and the origins of thrash with the exception of Lamb of God, who formed in the mid nineties.

British extreme metal band Napalm Death opened the show working the early crowd into a frenzy while still in the hottest part a Georgia August day. Bay Area thrashers Testament followed. Like most of the bands, they concentrated on fan favorites including “Over the Wall” and “Practice What You Preach,” but also worked some newer tracks into the set. Guitarist Alex Skolnick upheld his reputation as one the premiere guitar players in metal.

Somewhat surprisingly Anthrax was next on the bill. Certainly Lamb of God has been one of the most popular metal bands of the new millennium and many credit them with ushering in a new era of thrash, but as one of the original Big Four (the Big Four of thrash include the original four thrash bands: Metallica, Megadeth, Slayer, and Anthrax) many assumed Anthrax would play directly before Slayer. Some fans voiced their opinions that this was disrespectful to Anthrax, but it didn’t dampen their enthusiasm once they took the stage. With original singer Joey Belladonna back in the lineup, they ran down a list of greatest hits from that era including “Caught in the Mosh,” “ Madhouse,” “Antisocial,” “Indians,” and of course the Joe Jackson cover of “Got the Time.” It’s easy to forget that most of the musicians playing Friday are well into their fifties, but Anthrax still performs with the energy they did thirty years ago and Scott Ian is one of metal’s most iconic musicians and personalities. Anthrax has always seemed to be a band that could balance the seriousness and darkness of the music while remembering that ultimately it’s supposed to be fun. It’s good to see that hasn’t changed.

I admittedly have never followed Lamb of God closely but was told to reserve judgment until seeing them live. That was good advice. The band sounded great, but vocalist Randy Blythe commanded the stage with an intensity that could rival any. Pacing back and forth across the front of the stage like a caged lion, Blythe had the pit-faithful in full mosh mode. The front seven rows of seats were removed to make room for a general admission pit directly in front of the stage and the fans put this space to use during Lamb of God’s set.

My indifference to Lamb of God probably stems from an attitude that thrash was not just a style but an era and therefore not seeing any room for something new in genre. I may have to give their music a closer listen to see if I still feel the same way. I would recommend seeing them live and will definitely make an effort to see them perform again.

After four hours of music, the fans were primed for Slayer. They opened with “Repentless” off their most recent album. During the set, flames shot across the stage forming the shapes of pentagrams and inverted crosses. The heat could be felt from at least a hundred out from the stage. They played songs from their entire thirty-eight year career, but the latter half of their set concentrated more on the classics such “Chemical Warfare,” Seasons in the Abyss,” and “South of Heaven,” and the stadium erupted when the opening riff of  “Raining Blood” began. Slayer also paid tribute to founding guitarist Jeff Hanneman, who passed away in 2013.  A curtain was dropped with the words “Hanneman Angel of Death Still Reigning” written in the design of a Heineken logo, similar to the limited edition beer logo Heineken printed after his death. Knowing the set was coming to a close, Lakewood burst into a deafening roar when “Angel of Death” began. It’s a rare thing to see a band knowing it may be the last time and this was apparent to the fans as few left before the end of the show. It was clear they wanted all the Slayer they could get and Slayer gave them exactly what they wanted.

The tour continues through the end of the year. There are some European festival dates booked for 2019 and rumors of possible Big Four shows in the future, after which Slayer states they will retire. It’s difficult to imagine a metal world without Slayer. Even in my forties it seems like they’ve always been one of the defining bands in metal. Whether this will be the first on many “final” tours or the actual final tour we’ll have to wait and see. I suspect (and hope) that Slayer will continue showing professional dignity and end their career when it’s time without dragging the end out for several years. Either way, a final chance to see them live could be slipping away!

Lamb of God Photo Gallery

Naplam Death Photo Gallery

Testament Photo Gallery

Anthrax Photo Gallery

Slayer Photo Gallery

CD Review: “Jungle Rot” by Jungle Rot

After 25 years, Jungle Rot decided to name an album after the band. Jungle Rot is the tenth album from the band and is replete with the band’s signature sound of death metal groove and thrashing breakouts. Drummer Jesse Beahler, who played on Terror Regime in 2013, has returned and provides a technical edge missing on the band’s 2015 effort Order Shall Prevail. Album opener “Send Forth Oblivion” showcases Beahler’s skills as the song’s tempo seamlessly shifts from fast to mid-paced. The guitar riffs are chaotic and hit the listener from all sides. “Delusional Denial” is an onslaught of death-meets-thrash with front man and guitarist Dave Matrise unleashing machine gun riffs like a cornered gangster. The following track “A Burning Cinder” continues where “Delusional Denial” left off, providing a maelstrom of blast beats, descending riffs and Matrise harsh lyrics aimed at government corruption and greedy corporate officials. “Triggered” is a good ol’ hardcore stomp with Matrise and second guitarist Geoff Bub hammering out plodding riffs. This track induces headbanging and Matrise’s guttural yell before the breakdown is icing on the bloody cake. “Stay Dead” is another dynamic hitter with a bludgeoning riff that drives the song. The band pays homage to Kreator with a cover of the German thrash legends’ 1987 song “Terrible Uncertainty.” We see Jungle Rot’s thrash influence with this track as it twists and turns like a serpent.

Jungle Rot is superior to its predecessor Order Shall Prevail, as this record is more focused and aggressive. When the band plays fast, it plays fast and when it grooves, it grooves. While Matrise, Bub and bassist James Genenz are especially cohesive on this album, Beahler’s drumming provides the technical framework for the others to expound their playing. The riffs are more technical and the songs less restrained than the tracks on Order Shall Prevail .The production is clear and sharp which is great during the fast parts on this record.

Jungle Rot is arguably the band’s best record since Kill On Command in 2011. This record surpasses the band’s previous two albums by successfully melding the band’s penchant for playing in the pocket with technical precision. Jungle Rot is certainly worth the three year wait. I just hope the next record is released sooner. Highly recommended for fans of death metal and thrash.

Check out the band’s official website:

http://www.jungle-rot.com/

CD Review: “Oblivion” by Crematory

Crematory return with its 14th album, Oblivion, a steely slab of death metal, goth and industrial. “The Expectation” is a short orchestral piece that commences the album and concludes with a short poem that introduces the band. “Salvation” is noted for its rigid riffing and mechanic groove. The choir samples and majestic chorus contrast with the unyielding riffs making it a solid track. Things pick up on “Ghost Of The Past” with its melody and gothic keyboards. The driving nature of this track fits the haunting lyrics of one suffering from past demons. “Wrong Side” stands out with its blend of electronica and gothic metal. Front man Felix Stass’s vocals vary from harsh whispers to a guttural yet decipherable register during the chorus. Things take an interesting turn on “For All Of Us” which opens with a nu-metal riff before kicking into a fast tempo beat accompanied by stringed samples. The cookie cutter aggro main riff is out of place on this track, slightly weakening this song. Things improve on the grooving “Immortal” with its use of digital samples and crunchy riffs. The title track instantly assaults the ear drums with a slow heavy riff and dissonant keyboards that transitions towards a electronic rocker with a thumping bass. It is one of the best tracks on the album and guitarists Rolf Munkes and Tosse Basler showcase their versatility as players.

Oblivion is an accessible record with an ample supply of guitar riffs and guttural lite vocals. The riffing is a bit too aggro at times, which is a slight disappointment as Crematory can play solid melodic death metal. However, keyboardist Katrin Jullich does not overdo the samples and provides a beautiful classical landscape that complements the heavier side of the band. This record is what you introduce to someone that has graduated from lighter goth metal but not quite ready for At The Gates and Dismember. The production is great as each instrument is audible and the symphonic samples are never drowned out.

Crematory rage on after forming 27 years ago. Oblivion is another hit in the band’s discography that should satisfy fans of the band and garner some new ones. It has some good songs that will be staples at the band’s concerts and a few that should garner airplay. Oblivion’s album title is misleading as neither the album or the band will be forgotten.

For news and tour dates check out the band’s website:

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CD Review: “Vuur Van Verzet” by Heidevolk

Dutch folk metal outfit Heidevolk unleash its sixth record, Vuur Van Verzet, to commence the new year. The opening track “Ontwaakt” is equal parts pummeling and melodic with a cutting midsection that concludes with a weeping violin. That same stringed instruments opens the following track “Wolf In My Heart.” This catchy track is one of two songs on the album with lyrics in English. There is powerful symbolism on this track as vocalists Lars Nachtbraecker and Jacco Buhnebeest compare the warrior to the wolf. A predator that hunts his prey in the dead of night. It is a fairly straightforward song and thus one of the more accessible songs on Verzet. “Yngwaz Zonen” begins with a simple tribal drum and the group singing. Although I do not understand the lyrics, it evokes a spirit of unity and triumph. One can envision a group of Frankish warriors seated at a campfire recalling past battles. “O, Britannia” is driven by a thrashing riff and upbeat drumming before breaking down in to a grooving midsection replete with chanting and circular guitar solo. Alas, “The Alliance” is the second track sung in English. It opens with stomping drums and staccato riffs intertwined with acoustic guitar. There are several rhythm changes in this song that takes the listener on a journey, but never loses them. The sweeping riff near the song’s end is relentless before acoustic guitars drown it out and peacefully conclude the track. “Tiwaz” is a galloping number named at the rune symbolizing the Norse god Tyr. Tyr is associated with law and heroic glory and this rollicking song would certainly bring a smile to his face. “Gungnir” is the spear of Odin and this percussion driven track is both exuberant and ambitious. The unpredictable riffs complement the brutal drumming and gives the track a sense of urgency in a chaotic battle. A strong track certain to become a fan favorite.

Vuur Van Verzet is a heavy metal lesson in Dutch history. While I am not a Dutch speaker, it caused me to look up several words to understand their meaning. Thus, it is educational for listeners. The Amon Amarth comparisons will certainly come up, if they have not already. However, the Heidevolk’s music differs from its Swedish peers in that there is greater emphasis on traditional music and acoustic guitars. The band successfully mingles soft classical passages with melodic death metal, allowing for a varied sonic texture. Heidevolk is not as heavy as Amon Amarth, but the band is heavy when it wants to be. The songwriting is stellar and the production is crisp, especially with the percussion.

Ultimately, Vuur Van Verzet is for fans of folk, viking and melodic death metal. There is little filler here and each song seamlessly flows from one to the next. Pick this up for a night of headbanging in battle.

 

Check out the band’s website: http://www.heidevolk.com/

CD Review: “Psychosis” by Cavalera Conspiracy

Max and Igor Cavalera continue their brotherly brutality on Cavalera Conspiracy’s fourth record, Psychosis. Sepultura fans can rejoice as Psychosis is primarily based on Arise and Chaos A.D. with its fusion of hardcore, groove and thrash. There is even a smidgen of industrial to liven things up. Album opener “Insane” is a thrashing blitzkrieg with riffs that can slice through a tank. This track is relentless and annihilates everything in its path. “Terror Tactics” continues the metallic assault with maniacal drumming and skull splitting riffs. The song’s tempo abruptly changes into a nice groove with stomping riffs to conclude this track. “Crom” pays homage to the world of Conan the Barbarian. This ode to the Cimmerian god opens with tribal drums before Max breaks out a pummeling riff and Marc Rizzo plays an ear piercing solo and then chaos breaks loose. Rizzo’s hellish solos perfectly fit Max’s cacophonous rhythm guitar. The record takes an industrial detour on “Hellfire” with its repetitive robotic drumming and hypnotic guitar samples. This track seems slightly out of place halfway through a record of straight metal, but hats off to the guys for bringing in Justin Broadrick of Napalm Death and Godflesh to deliver vocals. Luckily, this is a brief detour as “Judas Pariah” is a mix of grindcore and groove metal that works quite well. Of course, a Cavalera album is not complete without a track rife with tribal percussion and we get that on the title track. This four minute instrumental is an amalgamation of tribal beats and electronica that is both mysterious yet uplifting. Oftentimes people underestimate how musically diverse the Cavaleras are and can compose very good world music. Album closer “Excruciating” is pure butchery as are privy to an endless firestorm of fast, sharp riffs and drumming. The track’s midsection then switches gears with a slower tempo and disturbing sound effects that concludes the record in haunting fashion.

Psychosis encapsulates everything fans love about pre-1997 Sepultura with its successful blend of metal and hardcore. The songs transition seamlessly from break neck speed to mid-tempo head movers. Max, Igor, Marc and bassist Andy Rizk can play in the pocket when necessary and then breakout without hesitation. This should not surprise anyone as Max and Igor have played together for over 30 years and made some of the most influential albums in heavy metal. One of the album’s few weak spots is the lack of lead playing from Marc Rizzo. Marc’s guitar work in Soulfly is incendiary and diverse, yet he is afforded few spots on Psychosis to showcase his playing. Hopefully he will show off his chops on the upcoming Soulfly record.

Ultimately, this album is a crusher that will please fans of Sepultura and extreme metal in general. It is Max and Igor Cavalera afterall, yet these brothers do not rest on their laurels and clearly put their hearts and souls into making this record. Psychosis is a lethal dose of thrash, hardcore, grindcore and industrial making it an unpredictable, but exciting listen from beginning to end.

Check out the band’s Facebook page for news and tour dates:

https://www.facebook.com/cavaleraconspiracy/

CD Review: “Profane Nexus” by Incantation

You can never underestimate the old guard. Incantation has spewed blasphemous, twisted death metal for 28 years. The band’s blend of death and gothic sludge has placed it in the upper echelons of extreme metal. After a six year hiatus, Incantation showed the metal world it could still the deliver the goods with its 2012 release, Vanquish In Vengeance. That creative kick continues on the group’s tenth album, Profane Nexus. “Muse” commences things in demonic fashion with a hypnotic guitar riff that explode into a cacophony of churning riffs. Vocalist and guitarist John McEntee’s guttural vocals are audible in the chaos, as if he is screaming from the depths of hell. On “Rites Of The Locust” the main spiraling riff perfectly parallels the drumming, like a demonic army marching off to war. Special attention should be paid to the slow paced coda with its grinding drums. Another highlight is the deformed beauty of “The Horns Of Gefrin.” The colossal, galloping opening instantly grabs the listener before it is interrupted by spurts of blast beats. It is an unpredictable song that transitions from fast to slow with a dynamic mid-section and tribal drums. “Lus Sepulcri” is an aggressive, straightforward track with roaring drums and dissonant guitars. The militaristic nature of the music differs from the twisted compositions the band is known for which makes it standout. “Ancients Arise” concludes Profane in grandiose fashion. It is a plodding, disturbing doom metal track reminiscent of Celtic Frost in its simplicity but sheer heaviness.

Profane Nexus is death/doom done right. It is not too complex, nor are the musical compositions clumsy. This should not surprise anyone as Incantation helped pioneer the sub-genre. The unorthodox riffing makes this an interesting album that is not generic in the slightest. Production wise this album is loud with a slight polish. It is not a perfect sounding album, which is good as that would detract from the menacing tone of the songs. It is a pulverizing but technical record.

Well, three albums into its comeback and Incantation are still on a roll. There are newer death metal bands that play more complex music than Incantation, but these groups lack the feel of the latter. Incantation do not play intricately for the sake of showmanship. The band’s dark message reflects the brutality of the music, which can be both elaborate and simple. Profane Nexus is another great release from this trio.

For news and tour dates, check out the band’s official website:

https://www.incantation.com/

CD Review: “Ascension Gate” by Dawn of Disease

German death metal quintet Dawn of Disease unleash its fourth album Ascension Gate only a year after its predecessor, Worship The Grave. Ascension is an amalgam of melodicism, brutal blast beats and melancholic doom riffs. The Swedish metal influence is apparent on “Perimortal” the album’s initial single. The sharp, baroque guitar riffs chop through the speakers like sabers while drummer Matthias Blasse pummels his kit with few moments to rest. “Leprous Thoughts” is a relentless thrasher with grinding riffs and pulverizing blast beats. The harmonious guitar solo contrasts perfectly with the brutal drumming and riffs on this track. “Ascension Gate” recalls Tales From A Thousand Lakes era Amorphis with its death meets doom metal sound. Tomasz Wisniewski’s guttural vocals match the haunting mood on this track, painting a picture of a gloomy night in the German countryside. A highlight is the eerie guitar line played before the track’s middle section. “Akephalos” is another crushing song that with buzzsaw guitars that could cut through a tank. The bombastic drumming only heightens the chaotic nature on this track.

Ascension Gate is an album pieced from several sub-genres. One cannot lump this record into the melodic death metal bin as there is too much going on during the album’s 50 minute duration. It is equal parts haute, classical bombast while also gloomy and downcast. Still, the band melds everything quite well and the record is not disjointed. The production is slightly muddled which detracts from the musicianship in some spots. However, it sounds superb when the band plays slow, heavy riffs. The percussion is loud and clear allowing the listener to hear all the rhythm changes and drum fills.

Dawn of Disease show its Scandinavian peers that German death metal is no joke on Ascension Gate. This record is both technical and pugnacious without overstaying its welcome. Fans of melodic death metal and even brutal death should enjoy this release. It does not have the finesse of Arch Enemy or Children of Bodom but it is certainly crushing. Dawn of Disease is poised to ascend to the heights of the metal realm with this record.

For news and tour dates, check out the band’s official Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/DawnOfDisease/