Willie Nelson review: live Atlanta, Chastain Ampitheatre

Willie Nelson review: live Atlanta, Chastain Ampitheatre May 17

Photos by Rose Riot

Full review as concert photography feature 

Willie Nelson, 81, plays a beaten-up guitar Saturday at Chastain Park Amphitheatre. Photo by Rose Riot

Willie Nelson, 81, plays a beaten-up guitar Saturday at Chastain Park Amphitheatre. Photo by Rose Riot

TAM 10

Willie Nelson, 81, plays a beaten-up guitar Saturday at Chastain Park Amphitheatre. Photo by Rose Riot

Willie Nelson, 81, plays a beaten-up guitar Saturday at Chastain Park Amphitheatre. Photo by Rose Riot

Willie Nelson, 81, plays a beaten-up guitar Saturday at Chastain Park Amphitheatre. Photo by Rose Riot

Willie Nelson, 81, plays a beaten-up guitar Saturday at Chastain Park Amphitheatre. Photo by Rose Riot

Willie Nelson, 81, plays a beaten-up guitar Saturday at Chastain Park Amphitheatre. Photo by Rose Riot

Willie Nelson, 81, plays a beaten-up guitar Saturday at Chastain Park Amphitheatre. Photo by Rose Riot

Willie Nelson, 81, plays a beaten-up guitar Saturday at Chastain Park Amphitheatre. Photo by Rose Riot

Willie Nelson, 81, plays a beaten-up guitar Saturday at Chastain Park Amphitheatre. Photo by Rose Riot

Willie Nelson, 81, plays a beaten-up guitar Saturday at Chastain Park Amphitheatre. Photo by Rose Riot

Tonight Alive’s The Other Side CD Review

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CD Review by Danielle Boise

 

Jenna McDougall fronts the alternative rock Aussie quartet, Tonight Alive. With a zeal and zest, Tonight Alive provokes a sense of lust for life, love and moving on with The Other Side, which is their stellar follow-up to 2012’s debut album, What Are You So Afraid Of?. The Other Side will be released on Sept. 10 from Fearless Records.

 

With a punk pop prowess stamped over the entire project, there is a sense of empowerment that courses through the entire 12 tracks that permeates The Other Side. The album brings a bite and edge to the tightly produced tracks that have a taste and feel to Paramore, circa Riot, with songs like “Don’t Wish” and “Lonely Girl.”

 

“The Ocean” starts The Other Side off with a sense of synergy and a vivacious drive, as the melody pulsates against McDougall’s almost sweet, Lzzy Hale-like voice. The listener just wants to get lost in a throbbing need that washes over them.

 

You can’t have your cake and eat it too with “Don’t Wish,” as the track has this push back and screw you identity to it as it speaks out to the guy that pushed you aside for another, yet still wants to hold on to you.

 

“The Fire” is fast, quick and heart slamming. It might be the shortest track on the album, but it packs a helluva punch, while “Bathwater” feels more intimate and exposed than the other songs, creating a sense of balance. But it’s “Say Please” that is truly raw and exposed. It’s as if there are cracks in the song that allows the listener some insight into McDougall’s mind.

 

All of the songs on The Other Side flow seamlessly together to create 38 minutes of musical freedom. Personally, for me I loved “Don’t Wish” and “Say Please” for completely different reasons – one is a soft, the other harder around the edges, yet both songs bring together a sense of self and wholeness.